Move over DCF and Xpac, there's a new backpack material sheriff in town.

Sirian

Backpacker
As I pondered above, the lowest weight so far is Ultra 200 which is too heavy. Perhaps if they can get an Ultra 50 or so it could be an option.
Seems like a logic thing to do. I mean if this new type of material performs much better than Dyneema then why not make a thin version of it for tents. Dyneema does the same thing as far as I know.
 

Rog Tallbloke

Thru Hiker
Yes sure. How much of that weight is due to stronger backing lamination and how much due to a denser mesh of fibres?
I don't know. But I do know 0.51 cuben is easily strong enough to make an overnighting pack from. It would have to be treated with care to keep it waterproof without having to add tenacious tape too frequently.
 

Sirian

Backpacker
The same apart from one being over 5 times lighter than the other. ;-)
Yeah but if Ultra 200 is 7(or 5, don't remember the exact number) times stronger than a similar Dyneema fabric like 2.92, then ultra 50 or even 30 could make a really good tent fabric.
 

Sirian

Backpacker
Yes sure. How much of that weight is due to stronger backing lamination and how much due to a denser mesh of fibres?
So appearantly this new fabric uses more UHMWPE than Dyneema. That's the magic stuff which makes it better
 

turkeyphant

Ultralighter
So appearantly this new fabric uses more UHMWPE than Dyneema. That's the magic stuff which makes it better
Yes that's the whole point. It uses much much more than DCF. We're talking about comparing different weights of DCF above.
 

Robert P

Section Hiker
Yeah but if Ultra 200 is 7(or 5, don't remember the exact number) times stronger than a similar Dyneema fabric like 2.92, then ultra 50 or even 30 could make a really good tent fabric.
Ultra might not be an ideal tent fabric regardless, if my understanding is correct. Ultra uses woven Dyneema, but needs a plastic film laminated on one side to provide waterproofness. DCF is a composite material formed from non-woven Dyneema between two sheets of plastic film, and can function as a standalone material, as in tents (and can be laminated to an additional face fabric to protect it further, as in pack fabrics). Even if you could achieve similar weights with lighter face fabric on the Ultra, the backing film (which provides the waterproofing) would be quite vulnerable on a tent. Just wondering if you could silicone coat woven Dyneema, but again it would probably end up being heavier - and excessively expensive...
 

vaguehead

Ultralighter
Another point which I'm basically just guessing but I believe the type of weave used in the Ultra line is one chosen for abrasion resistance. What's used in tents is meant for tear resistance because that's what matters for that use. Combined with the better water resistance of DCF I don't think Ultra will replace it as a tent material (but will for backpacks, and already is).
So appearantly this new fabric uses more UHMWPE than Dyneema. That's the magic stuff which makes it better

Dyneema is just a brand name for UHMWPE, the original one from the company that invented the stuff. Their patent ran out and they still make Dyneema, but UHMWPE is the same thing just generic.
 

JimH

Ultralighter
Fancy top end sails use a DCF like fabric where the fibres are only where needed (they use sail shaped moulds to construct it), possibly an option for the high volume shelter makers, imagine pulling a chunk of fabric out of a mould already in a Duplex or Notch shape with just the tie-outs to add.
 
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