Luxury items

Bmblbzzz

Section Hiker
Tangerines.
Not a luxury, a multi-use item. Can be eaten and also hydrate due to high water content. Vitamin and fibre content are on-the-go medicine. Sugar content provides instant energy perk and mental-health boost. The peel can be burnt to repel mosquitoes* or torn into small pieces and dropped behind you as you go in case you get lost, Hansel and Gretel style (or Theseus in the Minotaur's labyrinth). They can be used as gifts or bargaining tools when encountering uncontacted tribes, and if the tribes turn violent, they serve as missiles!

*It might work...
 

Chiseller

Thru Hiker
An anemometer is summat I've had in and out of a basket more times than I can recall. Just one of them items I've always been tempted to own, but couldn't quite settle on which one and how much I'd want to spend.

I'm not very data oriented, but I reckon they'd be very good for finding the threshold for kit and help make choosing clothes, quilts, bivis, shelters etc to suit the forecast. (allowing small margin for variables). Hmmm maybe next month... Price of diesel at the moment = Less travel to actually use the kit I've bought and don't use as much as I should... 😔
 

OwenM

Section Hiker
Being a sad geek keeping track of wind speed, wind chill and temps.
No doubt very interesting but does such information actually help? To quote Bob Dylan "You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows".
 

dovidola

Thru Hiker
No doubt very interesting but does such information actually help? To quote Bob Dylan "You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows".
I think it does help when we're trying to evaluate our kit's performance. For example, what was the actual windspeed our 'bomber' tent withstood (or didn't!), or what was the actual temperature overnight when our sleep system kept us comfortable (or didn't!). That data can help us plan better for kit selection on future hikes.
 

Chiseller

Thru Hiker
I think it does help when we're trying to evaluate our kit's performance. For example, what was the actual windspeed our 'bomber' tent withstood (or didn't!), or what was the actual temperature overnight when our sleep system kept us comfortable (or didn't!). That data can help us plan better for kit selection on future hikes.
th
 

Padstowe

Thru Hiker
I probably have a few luxury items alright but my mind goes to the Prism pants, I carry them all year now.
Almost didn't use them on my last trip as it was very warm even at night. But a night on a beach sleeping out with a sea fog surrounding me had me change from my down quilt to synthetic jacket and trousers with the inner thrown over the top of me (worked quite well).
Was a time I woulda considered a sleeping mat in such temps as a pure luxury and no real need, but I had a full sleeping mat plus a cut down torso length 3mm ccf for lounging around in. So what can I say now, I know I could get away without any of these items in summer, but I just don't want too anymore. :biggrin:
 

Bmblbzzz

Section Hiker
If a luxury is something intended to increase your comfort or enjoyment, then you could say every item taken is a luxury, as is every decision to leave an item behind. Some are luxury when you're sleeping, eating or engaging in some specific activity such as photography or meteorology, while others are luxury on your feet by virtue of their absence.
 

Taz38

Thru Hiker
I find that sort of data interesting. And it's indeed good to know the actual windspeeds to know how your shelter copes in certain conditions.

Some campers look at the forecast, quote the max gusts, then claim to have survived 70mph wind in their lanshan 😉 (not on this forum!).
 

Padstowe

Thru Hiker
If a luxury is something intended to increase your comfort or enjoyment, then you could say every item taken is a luxury, as is every decision to leave an item behind. Some are luxury when you're sleeping, eating or engaging in some specific activity such as photography or meteorology, while others are luxury on your feet by virtue of their absence.
I'd agree and somewhat disagree too. I mean there is practical comfort too for lack of a better phrase, as in is it a luxury to have rain wear in a country known for a lot of rain, and so on for other items with more need behind them being packed than rather just increase, ie, a mat in summer may just be an increase in comfort but becomes a need in cold winter or at least some form of insulation for health benefits if nothing else imo.
 

Bmblbzzz

Section Hiker
I'd agree and somewhat disagree too. I mean there is practical comfort too for lack of a better phrase, as in is it a luxury to have rain wear in a country known for a lot of rain, and so on for other items with more need behind them being packed than rather just increase, ie, a mat in summer may just be an increase in comfort but becomes a need in cold winter or at least some form of insulation for health benefits if nothing else imo.
Your somewhat disagreement is more than somewhat justified. I was using a deliberately tendentious and rather distorted concept of luxury. It would be fair to say that most things fall into the "practical comfort" category; they are not strictly needed for sheer survival but they are are not frivolities. Nevertheless, we will all have our own idea of what makes up practical comfort and when that comfort becomes impractical, as well as where we find the balance between "useful" and "desirable".

Someone mentioned they often take a book but find they don't read more than a few pages. I'm similar. I like to read in my tent before sleeping or sometimes just to have a break in the middle of the day. I could save weight and volume (maybe money too) by installing a kindle app on my phone (actually my phone is so ancient it probably wouldn't work, but that's another story) but I just prefer the experience of reading off a printed page. I guess that's my luxury!
 

Rog Tallbloke

Thru Hiker

Luxury or highly practical?
No longer available.
Nice idea if you can get it to work, but you end up drinking a lot of brews and TEG's tend to get burned out sooner or later when left unattended. You really need a constant flow of cold water to the system, which is tricky to arrange with a UL kit.
 

Cranston

Thru Hiker
No doubt very interesting but does such information actually help? To quote Bob Dylan "You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows".
I've been carrying an accurate battery operated fridge/freezer thermometer (after my anemometer battery wouldn't stay charged) but don't consider it a luxury item, for a while now (weighs app 30 gms) partly to measure the success (or lack thereof) of some of my DIY clothing. I've found testing my clothing myself-both active and static the thermometer has been incredibly useful.
Also it was especially useful when choosing my quilts. Just how much down do you need and how chunky a quilt you need to carry etc. in real world circumstances, all so I can trek-that bit lighter and warm.
I s'pose once you've fine tuned your stuff so that you can both walk and sleep dry and warm as possible, in the cold. it may be less 'necessary' -but I do like to at least know the temperatures day and night
.
I reckon were Bobby Dylan to get out and do some bushwalking, I'll bet he'd carry a wee Anemometer (and probably a Sphygmomanometer).
Let's face it, how can you tell if the answer is blowin' in the wind if you don't know at how many kms it's moving. It's only logical.
 
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Norrland

Ultralighter
No longer available.
Nice idea if you can get it to work, but you end up drinking a lot of brews and TEG's tend to get burned out sooner or later when left unattended. You really need a constant flow of cold water to the system, which is tricky to arrange with a UL kit.
It is available. You can even pick it up in most of the major high street retailers here in sweden. For example XXL:

 

Ed the Ted

Ultralighter
The only real luxury I consistently take is my e reader and since my partner bought a nice wee camera, that too (my cheap smartphone camera is criminally bad).
 

Rog Tallbloke

Thru Hiker

Odd Man

Thru Hiker
Weighs more than my 20Ah Anker powerbank, which does enough rapid charging to keep my phone and camera happy for a week. Not to mention the weight of gas it's going to get through!

It can use just wood fire too, so a bush box might work with it.

There's also the Biolite stove as well.
 

Rog Tallbloke

Thru Hiker
It can use just wood fire too, so a bush box might work with it.

There's also the Biolite stove as well.
5W is a slow charge. Will there be time to eat too? And you'll only get 5W when the water in the little folding cup at the top is cold. Which means you'll have to keep changing it every few minutes, in between splitting sticks for several hours. :o o:

When you get bored I'll rent you my Anker power brick for an hour. ;)
 

Odd Man

Thru Hiker
5W is a slow charge. Will there be time to eat too? And you'll only get 5W when the water in the little folding cup at the top is cold. Which means you'll have to keep changing it every few minutes, in between splitting sticks for several hours. :o o:

When you get bored I'll rent you my Anker power brick for an hour. ;)

I'm not recommending anything, just entertaining options. I have a few Anker power banks of my own to cover my needs. :thumbsup:
 
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