Atom Packs

vaguehead

Ultralighter
Isn't it padded on the back and then your stuff pads the other side?
No, on my bag the laptop sleeve has its own padding on all sides which protects it from the ground and contents of the bag.

If it didn't have that padding then it'd be no different than a slightly bigger hydration sleeve.😀
 

turkeyphant

Ultralighter
No, on my bag the laptop sleeve has its own padding on all sides which protects it from the ground and contents of the bag.

If it didn't have that padding then it'd be no different than a slightly bigger hydration sleeve.😀
I'm not saying that's how they all are (my laptop bag suspends it away from all edges) rather that is how Tom has designed a laptop sleeve with padding in an UL bag (and thus, by implication, answering your question about how useful it is). :)
 

simplerandomwalk

Trail Blazer
I would bet the laptop sleeve is similar to the Lycra mesh outside pocket but on the inside. There's padding against the back and, unless you put rocks in your bag, you probably don't need that much padding to protect the laptop on the inside.

This pack is for people who want ONE bag that will do hiking and work/commuting, which makes sense since for most people the volume would be quite similar. It's optimised for neither but is meant to do both quite well.
 

vaguehead

Ultralighter
My work laptop is worth about £2.5k.

Sorry dear company, I dropped my ultralight Atompack backpack containing your laptop and it broke. It has a laptop sleeve but with zero padding apart from the back panel, just some stretchy mesh. Yeah, I paid £175 for the bag. When can you send me a new laptop?
😄
 

simplerandomwalk

Trail Blazer
My work laptop is worth about £2.5k.

Sorry dear company, I dropped my ultralight Atompack backpack containing your laptop and it broke. It has a laptop sleeve but with zero padding apart from the back panel, just some stretchy mesh. Yeah, I paid £175 for the bag. When can you send me a new laptop?
😄
Why are you bashing on this without information? I expect Tom to have raised the laptop sleeve off the bottom of the pack so that, unless you only have the laptop in, it's not gonna touch when you put the pack down. Or to have some padding on the bottom. I admittedly don't know that he did, but you don't know that he didn't.
 

fluffkitten

Moderator
Staff member
And it has sold out. Didn't buy one, it is just not what I want. Might try for a custom Atom 30 at some point though.
 

vaguehead

Ultralighter
Why are you bashing on this without information? I expect Tom to have raised the laptop sleeve off the bottom of the pack so that, unless you only have the laptop in, it's not gonna touch when you put the pack down. Or to have some padding on the bottom. I admittedly don't know that he did, but you don't know that he didn't.

What information do I lack? In this thread it says it's sewn in and weighs 10g so can't have padding (besides the back panel).

I often put almost nothing in my laptop bag besides the laptop. Or the laptop plus charger. Seems a normal use case. There's a reason laptop sleeves are padded.

They've sold out at £195 each though... Which still doesn't mean it's a good design.
 

turkeyphant

Ultralighter
I suspect people with laptops worth £2.5k aren't the target audience.

I think it would be fine for my laptop though if I had a device I were concerned about I suspect the most UL option would be for a 10g pouch and then if I require additional padding to provide my own sleeve.

Certainly better than having permanent padding in the pack that I can't remove when I'm not carry a delicate device.
 

vaguehead

Ultralighter
Well, most laptops are valuable items whether in monetary terms or not.

A better solution, and one I assumed they would do, would be a removable padded laptop sleeve. Then you can have it all.

But still, why bother with an ultralight pack at all of you're going to be carting laptops around or day hiking.
 
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simplerandomwalk

Trail Blazer
Well, most laptops are valuable items whether in monetary terms or not.

A better solution, and one I assumed they would do, would be a removable padded laptop sleeve. Then you can have it all.

But still, why bother with an ultralight pack at all of you're going to be carting laptops around or day hiking.
Most laptop packs don't have the features we like in a hiking pack, like some kind of mesh on the front and decent bottle pockets (like without compression straps across them, the existence of which baffles me every day). And for a commuting pack, all you probably really want is a spot for your laptop, some volume for extras (packed lunch, bike helmet, etc.) and perhaps some weather resistance...

For my personal use the mesh sleeve with padding against the back and an offset from the ground is enough protection, so I'd be happy with that. If I put items with sharp corners in the pack, I can make sure there's soft stuff between them and the laptop or figure out some other way. Like @turkeyphant was saying, you can always add your own sleeve for commuting when you care less about weight.

Again I think this pack tries to be good for both uses, but is perfect for neither. It doesn't have 360 laptop protection: not perfect for commuting. It's not the most ultralight day hiking pack: not perfect for hiking. Some people are happy with the compromises in order to have one bag instead of two.

By the way, I think you can add a custom option of the laptop sleeve (not padded) on an Atom: that way you don't have the padded back when you don't want it (hiking) but you do (by using your own laptop sleeve) when you commute.

Either way, it's perfectly fine if this is not the right pack for you, but it doesn't mean it's a worthless design.
 

vaguehead

Ultralighter
And for a commuting pack, all you probably really want is a spot for your laptop, some volume for extras (packed lunch, bike helmet, etc.) and perhaps some weather resistance...

Yes, and then you have a lunch box and bike helmet bouncing around with your laptop protected by 10g of stretchy mesh.

The alternatives you suggest to protect a laptop are:

a) Get an additional laptop sleeve and put in the bag. So pay £195 for an ultralight bag where 'carrying a computer' is a highlighted feature only to add weight, cost and hassle in the form of a separate sleeve. Say £25 for a sleeve... We're now at £220.

b) Add soft stuff to protect the laptop. This is extra hassle and weight and likely won't work as well until you've got a fair amount of it in.

With these additions this ultralight solution is no longer ultralight. Not that this ever mattered anyway (unless you can get multi day gear in a bag this small). It's still not particuarly durable given ultralight materials. Or don't protect the laptop that much and accept the risk.

For £195. This is silly.

Osprey Talon 22. Half the price. Has helmet attachment on outside and better hip belt for cycling. Similar 'laptop sleeve' they just call it a 'hydration sleeve'. More durable, Osprey will probably give you a new one if it fails anyway. Doesn't matter that it's heavier than the Atompack Nanu. Or one of their many bags with a proper laptop sleeve. Or from Sweden a Fjallraven Ulvo 23 which has a padded laptop sleeve. From somewhere else in America the Patagucci Black Hole 25l which also has a padded laptop sleeve.
 
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mjh

Backpacker
The alternatives you suggest to protect a laptop are:

a) Get an additional laptop sleeve and put in the bag. So pay £195 for an ultralight bag where 'carrying a computer' is a highlighted feature only to add weight, cost and hassle in the form of a separate sleeve. Say £25 for a sleeve... We're now at £220.

b) Add soft stuff to protect the laptop. This is extra hassle and weight and likely won't work as well until you've got a fair amount of it in.

With these additions this ultralight solution is no longer ultralight. Not that this ever mattered anyway (unless you can get multi day gear in a bag this small). It's still not particuarly durable given ultralight materials. Or don't protect the laptop that much and accept the risk.

For £195. This is silly.
Not sure why you’re so upset about it! You’ve said yourself you don’t really get it and it isn’t for you - that’s fine (there’s plenty of gear that none of us want), but most of us don’t feel the need to rubbish it on the web.

Personally I don’t think it is fair to compare a small bespoke Uk manufacturer with a large rucksack manufacturer like Osprey but hey ho! Live and let live!
 

ADz

Thru Hiker
Yes, and then you have a lunch box and bike helmet bouncing around with your laptop protected by 10g of stretchy mesh.

The alternatives you suggest to protect a laptop are:

a) Get an additional laptop sleeve and put in the bag. So pay £195 for an ultralight bag where 'carrying a computer' is a highlighted feature only to add weight, cost and hassle in the form of a separate sleeve. Say £25 for a sleeve... We're now at £220.

b) Add soft stuff to protect the laptop. This is extra hassle and weight and likely won't work as well until you've got a fair amount of it in.

With these additions this ultralight solution is no longer ultralight. Not that this ever mattered anyway (unless you can get multi day gear in a bag this small). It's still not particuarly durable given ultralight materials. Or don't protect the laptop that much and accept the risk.

For £195. This is silly.

Osprey Talon 22. Half the price. Has helmet attachment on outside and better hip belt for cycling. Similar 'laptop sleeve' they just call it a 'hydration sleeve'. More durable, Osprey will probably give you a new one if it fails anyway. Doesn't matter that it's heavier than the Atompack Nanu. Or one of their many bags with a proper laptop sleeve. Or from Sweden a Fjallraven Ulvo 23 which has a padded laptop sleeve. From somewhere else in America the Patagucci Black Hole 25l which also has a padded laptop sleeve.


Meh, The Atom Nanu looks better, is a local manufactuerer and does custom requests.
 

vaguehead

Ultralighter
Not sure why you’re so upset about it!
I'm not upset. What a Facebook thing to say.

Personally I don’t think it is fair to compare a small bespoke Uk manufacturer with a large rucksack manufacturer like Osprey but hey ho!
I wasn't, I was comparing their products, I don't think custom options are available on the Nanu either so it's not bespoke. Why is it not fair to compare their products anyway? They both make similar things so why not. Does Atompacks have to reach a certain number of employees or revenue amount before it's a 'fair' comparision? Who told you life (or the outdoor gear business) was fair?

You’ve said yourself you don’t really get it and it isn’t for you - that’s fine (there’s plenty of gear that none of us want), but most of us don’t feel the need to rubbish it on the web.
No, I think I get the Atompack Nanu, I just think it's a poorly conceived product for the detailed reasons I've given above. If you have anything to add on that then do so, but you haven't so far.

As to why I like discussing outdoor gear in detail I just do, hiking is one of my hobbies and I enjoy discussing the details of the products. Dan Durston said in a podcast something along the lines that he likes to and believes it's possible to 'solve' or 'optimise' hiking equipment. I'm the same way.

Before you go all Facebook on me again and claim I'm bashing a UK cottage company for no reason blah blah blah, I do actually own an Atompacks backpack and wouldn't have bought it if I didn't think it was excellent. They make lots of great products and given their success others think the same way.
 

mjh

Backpacker
That is an odd response, but you might need to look in the mirror as I really can’t see that you’re offering much to this discussion for the reasons I’ve explained.

If anything coming onto a forum and telling everyone why you don’t like and won’t buy something is far more “Facebook” but hey each to their own…
 

vaguehead

Ultralighter
That is an odd response, but you might need to look in the mirror as I really can’t see that you’re offering much to this discussion for the reasons I’ve explained.

I've offered more than you in the form of reasons why I think it's a poorly conceived product, none of which you've addressed. All you've done is claim I'm upset, say it's a bad thing being negative about a product on the Internet and that it's not fair to compare two companies which sell similar products.

If anything coming onto a forum and telling everyone why you don’t like and won’t buy something is far more “Facebook” but hey each to their own…

What's wrong with saying why I think a product's poorly conceived on a relevant thread on a relevant Internet forum?
 

simplerandomwalk

Trail Blazer
I think perhaps it sounds like you're criticising the pack for not doing something it's not designed to do. It's mostly a day hiking pack that can double as a commuting pack for those who find those features sufficient. Again, optimised for neither. And maybe you're phrasing things as "it's an objectively bad pack" when it's only subjectively bad for you, while it might work for other people. Everyone's mileage varies.

My feeling is we've all made our arguments clear and people reading this thread can get a feeling for why they should/shouldn't get it. It's pointless to keep arguing for a universal good/bad answer that doesn't exist.
 

vaguehead

Ultralighter
I think perhaps it sounds like you're criticising the pack for not doing something it's not designed to do. It's mostly a day hiking pack that can double as a commuting pack for those who find those features sufficient.

Atompacks describe it like this:
Recently redesigned, the Nanu is our go everywhere day bag. It's as at home on the commute to work as it is in the mountains.
Source: Atompack Nanu

From that I understand it is supposed to be not mostly a day hiking pack that can be used as a commute pack, but equally a mountain / hiking and commute pack.

And maybe you're phrasing things as "it's an objectively bad pack" when it's only subjectively bad for you, while it might work for other people. Everyone's mileage varies.

Personally, I do have an issue with the general rise of subjectivity and decline of objectivity, not just with discussing backpacks so I tend to compensate which might be a mistake.

From Atompack Nanu:

This means that whether you are just taking your computer and some lunch or you're headed to the beach and have stuffed the bag to bursting, it still carries well (and we think it looks rather good too!)

My argument there is that if the manufacturer is mentioning carrying a computer as a part of the main description of a £195 20L EDC backpack it should be extremely good at carrying a computer. The Nanu is objectively not good at that because it doesn't have a fully padded laptop sleeve. Which is a shame because Atompacks' other bags are very good at what they set out to do.

I know I'm repeating myself here but to me that seems pretty objective, maybe not .


My feeling is we've all made our arguments clear and people reading this thread can get a feeling for why they should/shouldn't get it. It's pointless to keep arguing for a universal good/bad answer that doesn't exist.

I agree, well, mostly for the first part.:) And this topic has become pretty boring now so...
 
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