Alpkit trekking poles?

snow

Trail Blazer
Anyone have experience with Alpkit trekking poles? Noticed the "XL" poles which go up to 150cm(!), would save my bringing the pole extender for my Cricket.

Specs look good as well, including the lower section not being carbon.
 

Enzo

Thru Hiker
I've used the full carbon ones a lot. Two down sides,
I've had two lower sections fail, once due to normal falling down welsh hill, less of a prob on the 150cm ones as they're alloy as you say. The other failed due to twist lock mechanism failing. Pole bottoms used to be available but i cant see them atm.
Second problem is you get used to a 136g narrow pole and when I went out with my new komperdell carbon/alloy poles they felt so cumbersome I carried them after the first few miles.
The 150 are cheaper than the carbonlites, and use flick locks so should be more reliable. Can't see if they are 16-14-12 or 18-16-14mm.
I used to just stuff both my carbon lites in the apex of my shelter if the weather picked up.
 

ZenTrekker

Section Hiker
I had some of the original Alpkit carbon poles. They lasted for years until "she who must" borrowed them and got one jammed in a boulder field and went over. When they fail they fail spectacularly. Having said that Alpkit found an old lower section knocking about their factory and sent it to me FOC, brilliant service.

The older versions used to suffer from issues with the twist-locks,I could never get them tight. I've since bought the new version of the Alpkit carbon poles and they lock really tight, no issues whatsoever. I agree with @Enzo once you've used lightweight carbon poles, everything else seems cumbersome.

Also with alloy poles, the sections can corrode causing problems, full carbon poles can't corrode!
 

benp1

Trail Blazer
I also have the original Alpkit carbonlite ones. They work fine still, though I tend to use a single Easton z folding carbon one as it packs smaller and has a flick lock
 

Dave V

Moderator
Staff member
I had a set of the original Carbon Lite Poles, they worked well as walking poles in the dry but found the bottom section always slipped if it was raining.

I also used them with my Trailstar and they nearly always slipped.
 

ZenTrekker

Section Hiker
I had a set of the original Carbon Lite Poles, they worked well as walking poles in the dry but found the bottom section always slipped if it was raining.

I also used them with my Trailstar and they nearly always slipped.
The new versions are a lot better, never had any trouble with slipping
 

Nevis

Thru Hiker
Have had 2 sets of the carbon lites replaced after bottom section snaps, the gf has also had a set replaced. Only plus point is tha alpkit replaced them straightaway with no fuss.
 

rubble

Hiker
Alpkit currently have 20% off their trekking poles .... worth a look if "needing" to purchase ...
 

Enzo

Thru Hiker
I found the best way to tighten them to get the 2 joints snug, then fully tighten holding above the top joint and bellow the bottom. No slippage.
 

WilliamC

Thru Hiker
Has anybody got any more feedback on Alpkit poles? The Carbonlongs are 20% off at the moment and I could do with some 150cm poles...
 

tarptent

Section Hiker
I'm in the market for ultralight trekking poles...But, they cost a lot of money. The Alpkits mentioned earlier are really cheap, but they weigh 215g each, so I do not consider them ultralight (They would have to be under 200g for that).
I found out today that Jumper Home, the maker of my ultralight Mountain House 1.5P DCF tent, makes ultralight carbon trekking poles too and in two versions. Both have a max length of 145cm, which makes them very attractive to me as I need a pole that extends to at least 140cm.
He calls them "Feather Poles".
The normal feather pole can handle a 100kg down load (full body weigh plus pack weight) and weighs 145g per pole.
The "enhanced" heavy duty version weighs 155g per pole.
They can be fully extended from minimum length to maximum length in as little as 3 seconds (as he shows in a video).
Their minimum length is 60cm, which is pretty compact for such long poles. The Alpkits have a minimum length of 67cm.
The pair of enhanced feather poles (the ones I would need to go for due to my weight) cost about £113 in UK money, with free delivery...Which actually makes them a bargain.
 
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mjh

Backpacker
I like my BD carbon distance Z poles much more than a variety of alloy poles that I’ve had but that is down to the fact the balance and grips work for me. My suspicion is that like quite a few bits of equipment there is no one size fits all best recommendations but what works best for you.

Yes, carbon fibre does have a tendency to fail spectacularly if it fails rather than bend like alloy but people still manage quite happily with carbon trekking poles (and bikes etc).
 

Balagan

Thru Hiker
I'm in the market for ultralight trekking poles...But, they cost a lot of money. The Alpkits mentioned earlier are really cheap, but they weigh 215g each, so I do not consider them ultralight (They would have to be under 200g for that).
I found out today that Jumper Home, the maker of my ultralight Mountain House 1.5P DCF tent, makes ultralight carbon trekking poles too and in two versions. Both have a max length of 145cm, which makes them very attractive to me as I need a pole that extends to at least 140cm.
He calls them "Feather Poles".
The normal feather pole can handle a 100kg down load (full body weigh plus pack weight) and weighs 145g per pole.
The "enhanced" heavy duty version weighs 155g per pole.
They can be fully extended from minimum length to maximum length in as little as 3 seconds (as he shows in a video).
Their minimum length is 60cm, which is pretty compact for such long poles. The Alpkits have a minimum length of 67cm.
The pair of enhanced feather poles (the ones I would need to go for due to my weight) cost about £113 in UK money, with free delivery...Which actually makes them a bargain.
However, there is another solution that would only be about 30g-50g heavier than the feather poles, but about 100-120g lighter than than the Alpkits, not that much more expensive than the Alpkits, with a minimum length of only 58cm, and offering Alloy pole reliability...A pair of Fizan Compact Trekking Poles (which are currently a top pick at UOG, and a pole extension.
Despite being alloy three section poles, the Fizans only weigh 170g each, which is definitely still ultralight, and they cost £69.99 each. I've never had Carbon poles before, and to honest I have heard so many scare stories about them snapping/breaking, I would rather have ultralight alloy poles that are relatively cheap than expensive but potentially unreliable Carbon poles. I have a feeling most of you would agree.
A pole extension (I made one from 16cm of 20cm PVC conduit and a rounded end cap) weighs about 25g...A Carbon fibre version is half that, but a lot more expensive, so a Fizan with a 100mm extension (142cm max length) would still weigh under 200g.
I am open to other sensible suggestions, as long as they are under 180g per pole and inexpensive.
Update: Rohan says the Fizans only weigh 158g each! (not sure about that, but it would be great if they are)...And they are doing them for only £32 each!

Locus Gear CP3 poles, £95 a pair delivered from Japan, 155 gr each according to Locus Gear, mine are 152 gr and 160 with the small basket. All carbon fibre but rock steady and I would trust them to support me and my pack in anything gnarly because they already have. They extend to 135 but that is fine, I carry a 20 gr carbon fibre tube that replaces the lower sections and allows the uppers to be combined for a single strong pole of 180+ cm.

There are probably as many stories of alloy poles bending as there are of carbon poles snapping. It's just a matter of personal preference depending on your happy or otherwise experience. Me, I would not touch any poles with an internal locking system again... But that's just me. Plenty of people have no issues with them.
 
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