A Philistines menu - cost/calories/weight per day

maddogs

Ultralighter
Maybe not gourmet but a (family size) bag of crisps works well for me as an additional daytime snack. Fatty. Salty. mmmmm.
High calorie density (~520kcal/100g).
Crushed it'll fit in a small ziploc bag; eat with a spoon.

I prefer home dehydrated sauces for main meals (bolognese, curry, stews, chillis) when I can. Always feels like a treat compared to a packet of something from the supermarket.
 

old-skool-lite

Thru Hiker
I have been down the dehydration route before but lack the organisational skills for it to be viable for backpacking. Passed the machine on to a mate. I am improving with bulk stews etc for the freezer. I do sometimes take a smaller bag of posh crisps for a 2 day trip.
 

echo8876

Thru Hiker
i do something similar, but lighter at 640g per day for the same 3000kcal, mostly by more fats and candy.
i find dry-smoked sausage\salami indisposable.
i also tried dehydration(drying machine), but it didnt work out for me.
 

dovidola

Thru Hiker
I like the ideas of custard and burfi. I have in the past often taken marzipan - which is healthy, okay, cos it's made of nuts - but with scotch? Not for me, though I can kind of see the combo.
It is the dark-chocolate coated posh marzipan...
 

Rog Tallbloke

Thru Hiker
Lunch is oatcakes for me - I can eat them day after day without palling :thumbsup:

When I was a kid we'd occasionally go to Skipton, and a bakery called Whittakers used to sell 'floppy oat cakes'. Not sure how they were made, but had a consistency similar to a Galette Breton, and about the size of a pitta bread. Less prone to breaking up than biscuity oatcakes, and really good rolled up with almost anything you like inside. Maybe you could try dehydrating some porridge to see if that would work.
 

kvragu

Ultralighter
When it comes to backpacking I've been eating a similar menu for decades. I always look forward to my meals & it's all easy to prepare. I used to have cake bars & custard for pudding. These days I often don't have the appetite so leave it to boost breakfast. Currently the only nod to 'specialist' food is the Mountain Fuel & it's the biggest cost per portion. I may go back to a regular oat mix when the box has run out. Everything else is supermarket - mainly Aldi with the odd item from B&M next door. Suits me as I hate the experience of the big supermarkets & means my money goes further. Even though I can get a wide range of specialist food at a good discount they don't appeal!

Interesting to see that this is roughly in line with other menus I've seen here for daily calories & weight. Doesn't include my black tea or a couple of McDonalds pepper sachets per day.

Summary per day
Kcal - 2938
Weight - 784g
Cost - £6.53

Sorry if this makes the gourmets wince!

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I need to do a double-take but am I a pig if I tend to eat about twice as much per day?
Good topic, I was never really happy with my food strategy, but im simultaneously picky and stingy.
 

Bmblbzzz

Thru Hiker
I think I probably prefer the pancakey oatcakes but the biscuity ones are more readily available (down here).
 

Stube

Trail Blazer
Regarding Pasta ready meals. I've noticed that Batchelors ones are always just "chicken flavour" whereas the Tesco own brands are real chicken and cheaper. It's a win win.:D
 

Robert P

Thru Hiker
Lunch is oatcakes for me - I can eat them day after day without palling :thumbsup:.
With cheese for the first couple of days, before it goes "off", and then with tuna thereafter.
These pouches are easy to carry and work out just right for me.
https://www.sainsburys.co.uk/gol-ui/product/john-west-tuna-with-a-twist--lime---black-pepper-85g
There is a tomato flavour one too.
I've gone off tuna recently, since having a minor mishap. I opened a can of tuna and just a small amount of the accompanying liquid dripped in the tent inner floor. It took some time, wiping and airing to rid the tent of the lingering a faint fishy smell.
 

Seòrsa

Section Hiker
I went into an Aldi today to pick up some of those 19p High Protein Bars, but they were £1.29. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding your chart?
Dont you just love UK inflation William, 🤣 You never misread the chart they were up there for 19p each, only ones Ive seen at ALDI are same £1.29
 

cathyjc

Thru Hiker
I've gone off tuna recently, since having a minor mishap. I opened a can of tuna and just a small amount of the accompanying liquid dripped in the tent inner floor. It took some time, wiping and airing to rid the tent of the lingering a faint fishy smell.
I don't tend to eat lunch in my tent :cautious:
I rarely eat or drink anything inside the inner of my tent - too bothered about messing up on my sleeping bag.
 

Robert P

Thru Hiker
I don't tend to eat lunch in my tent :cautious:
I rarely eat or drink anything inside the inner of my tent - too bothered about messing up on my sleeping bag.
It was an evening meal, to which I added tuna, but managed to spill a bit inside rather than the porch. Personally 95% of the time I eat in the inner tent, because it is often too wet, windy and dark outside, and it is more comfortable sitting / laying on the sleeping mat. I'm careful about the sleeping bag but the odd drip gets through...
 

Colombo

Trail Blazer
I would avoid tuna fish cans in olive oil: those cans can actually wound you, especially if you have wet hands (they did with me, their fault obviously) and I would eliminate a possible cause of problems.

If you are in the habit of not eating the oil, tuna fish in brine is better, because some vitamins are fat-soluble and they transfer into the oil, to be thrown away when you throw away the oil.

A practical and relatively cheap solution is a tuna paste, such as this: https://www.riomare.it/prodotti/pate/pate-di-tonno/ it contains a bit too much water but it's acceptable as a seasoning.

If you plan to transfer it into a lighter container, you could easily prepare something like that at home, adding maybe pistachios, or onion, or garlic, or dried tomatoes etc. and using a blender. I have no idea how much it would last in an edible form, but I suspect for "some days" in mild weather should be fine. I would add pepper as a preservative, and because it's a marriage made in heaven. That would make a nice seasoning for your pasta, or can be enjoyed with rye crackers etc.

Another alternative is dehydrated and smoked tuna fish, which the Japanese call Katsuobushi, and that isn't that cheap, €86/kg, but maybe not so expensive: if we imagine 100g of dehydrated fish correspond to 400g of hydrated fish, that is €21,5/kg, which is less than twice what one pays in a supermarket for normal canned tuna fish, without the smoking. No oil to mess with, no cutting cans, lightweight.

Just my €0,02
 
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old-skool-lite

Thru Hiker
I went into an Aldi today to pick up some of those 19p High Protein Bars, but they were £1.29. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding your chart?

Dont you just love UK inflation William, 🤣 You never misread the chart they were up there for 19p each, only ones Ive seen at ALDI are same £1.29


Sorry guys! I exported it from lighterpack & added the cost/kcal/weight per portion info. Made a mess of the bar & oakcake info.

Capture.JPG
 

hoefnix

Hiker
Another alternative is dehydrated and smoked tuna fish, which the Japanese call Katsuobushi, and that isn't that cheap, €86/kg, but maybe not so expensive: if we imagine 100g of dehydrated fish correspond to 400g of hydrated fish, that is €21,5/kg, which is less than twice what one pays in a supermarket for normal canned tuna fish, without the smoking. No oil to mess with, no cutting cans, lightweight.

Just my €0,02
If you are buying katsuobushi add some dried wakame (seewead), dashi / dashi no moto (stock powder) and kombu (also seaweed) to your list to make very tasty meals.
In August we rice (pre-boiled), wakamé, dried shrimp (super yummie) and dahsi no-moto (fish stock) which was like a gourmet meal.
 

AmateurHiker

Trail Blazer

echo8876

Thru Hiker
since im packing
moFOJ4E.jpeg


plus 150g of smoked sausage, 50g of condensed milk and 25g of nesquick per day.
about 10 eur per day
 

Colombo

Trail Blazer
If you are buying katsuobushi add some dried wakame (seewead), dashi / dashi no moto (stock powder) and kombu (also seaweed) to your list to make very tasty meals.
In August we rice (pre-boiled), wakamé, dried shrimp (super yummie) and dahsi no-moto (fish stock) which was like a gourmet meal.

Thanks, I did not know the existence of stock powder and dried shrimps. Very good for hiking for sure. If I only could find dried wine! (Probably indecent if I find it, but I would try it).
 

Tartanferret

Thru Hiker
Thanks, I did not know the existence of stock powder and dried shrimps. Very good for hiking for sure. If I only could find dried wine! (Probably indecent if I find it, but I would try it).
You can buy wine powder but it’s for cooking not drinking. 😀
 
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